Shih Tzu

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Shih Tzu
(Chinese Lion Dog) (Lion Dog) (Chrysanthemum Dog)

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Happy puppies

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Cali and Sienna love their new orapup

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Top 10 Funniest Videos of August 2013

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Scared Dogs Made Drastically Calmer By Thundershirt!

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English Bulldog Puppy Loves Rolling Down Hills

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English Bulldog Puppy Loves Rolling Down Hills

 

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RESEARCH INDICATES THAT DOGS CAN FEEL LOVE

Posted by: Kathy  /  Category: How to care for your Shih-Tzu puppy

    RESEARCH INDICATES THAT DOGS CAN FEEL LOVE

    THE DAILY DISHMore on PawNation: AwesomeBehaviorDogsRelationshipScience

    By  Jan 28th 2014

    Researchers are working to prove what dog owners have said for years. Dogs really do love us! Scientists at Emory University in Atlanta, Ga., have discovered that dogs do in fact experience feelings of love and affection.

    After training dogs to tolerate the noise of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, a team of scientists was able to get clear images of dogs’ brains without sedating them.

    “I thought that if military dogs can be trained to jump out of helicopters then surely we could train them to sit still inside an MRI scanner,” said neuroscientist Gregory Berns.

    The team used hand signals to tell the dogs that they were going to receive treats while they were in the scanner. The resulting images showed that the caudate nucleus, a part of the brain related to positive emotions, was similar in both humans and dogs. This discovery lead the team to believe that dogs are capable of feeling emotions associated with love.

    “We can really begin to understand what a dog is thinking rather than infer it from their behavior,” Berns said.

    Many scientists argue that the bond between an owner and their dog goes no further than a dog’s need for safety and food. Bern’s and his team’s next step in their research is to prove this belief to be false by offering dogs food from strangers and machines.

    “If, as many scientists have argued in the past, it is all simply about getting food for dogs, then the reaction in their brains would be the same no matter who or what is offering them the food,” Bern said.

    Bern and his team will continue their research, working to prove that dogs love their owners as more than just a source of food and security.

    “We hope to show that they love us for things far beyond food, basically the same things that humans love us for, like social comfort and social bonds,” Berns said.

    MORE ON PAWNATION: 13 Ways Your Dog Shows You Love

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    6 Ways to Naturally Prevent and Get Rid of Fleas on Dogs

    Posted by: Kathy  /  Category: How to care for your Shih-Tzu puppy

    6 Ways to Naturally Prevent and Get Rid of Fleas on Dogs

    I share my life with many four-legged friends, owning 2 dogs and fostering at least 2 others at any given time. My canine companions make up a huge part of my life so, naturally, I want to care for them…naturally. Like human medications popular dog medications, such as flea and tick preventatives, are full of strange chemicals that could have potentially harmful side effects. If you have little ones running around the house, you don’t want them getting into the medication or touching the dog after it’s applied. Since I foster and have rescues coming in from all kinds of places, I have to be up on the flea care year round. Instead of constantly applying synthetic repellents, there are natural substitutes I can turn to that can help keep the little beasties at bay.

    6 Home Remedies for Fleas- keep your dogs bite free without using harsh chemicals.

    Why the ingredients: The essential oils/ingredients used here are all natural insecticide/pesticides, shown to either kill or deter the pests due to their various compounds/naturally occurring chemicals. Indeed, many of them are found in commercial flea/tick preventative.

    1. Flea collar

    A flea collar is a great way to ward off fleas without always having to reapply something topically, and it keeps the flea control constant and steady.

    You will need…

    -3-5 drops of cedar oil or lavender oil
    – 1-3 tablespoons of water
    -Bandana OR your dog’s collar
    -an eyedropper (optional)

    Directions

    Dilute 2-3 drops of your chosen oil in 1-3 tablespoons of water. Some people use the oil undiluted, but I personally feel it should always be diluted, even if it’s only by a little. Next, pick out a bandana to be the flea collar-I think a bandana is preferable because you can take it on and off and your dog’s collar won’t smell. It’s always fun to get creative with patterns and colors here. If you go up to ½ teaspoon you can use up to 5 drops of the liquid. Using an eyedropper or other similar means, apply 5-10 drops of the mixture to the bandana and rub the sides of the fabric together, and then tie it about your dog’s neck in a snazzy way. Reapply oil mixture to the collar once a week. In conjunction with this, 1 or 2 drops of oil diluted with at least 1 tablespoon of olive oil can be placed at the base of your dog’s tail.

    flea collar

    koda

    2. Flea deterring drink- can be used alongside any of these remedies.

    You will need…

    -1 teaspoon white distilled vinegar or apple cider vinegar

    Directions

    For every 40 pound dog add 1 teaspoon of white distilled vinegar or apple cider vinegar to 1 quart of their drinking water. We highly recommend using Braggs Apple Cider Vinegar. Not only does it deter fleas, it improves a pups skin and coat condition from the inside-out.

    drink to get rid of fleas

    3. Flea comb

    This contains lemon and lemon contains something called limonene, which is a chemical that kills and repels fleas but is harmless to us or our pets.

    You will need…

    -1 freshly sliced up lemon
    -1 pot of fresh water
    -a comb, sponge, or brush

    Directions

    Boil a pot of water and add the slices of a freshly cut lemon to it. Turn off the heat after the lemons has been added and cover the pot, letting the mixture steep overnight. The next day dip a comb or your pets brush in the liquid (make sure it’s sufficiently cool) and run it through their hair. A sponge works as well, especially if you have a very short haired breed. A quick version is to bring water to a vigorous boil and then pour over a freshly sliced lemon. Then just dip the comb, let it cool, and use as above.

    comb

    4. Flea spray

    As a bonus, your pup will get a nice gleaming finish to their coat after using this flea spray.

    You will need…

    -1 cup white distilled vinegar OR 1 cup apple cider vinegar OR a 50/50 blend of both
    -1 quart fresh water
    -2-3 drops of lavender or cedar oil
    -a decent sized spray bottle

    Directions

    The essential oil isn’t vital, but it certainly gives the spray an extra edge (and a nice smell.) If you’re using it, add 2-3 drops as you add 1 cup of white distilled vinegar/apple cider vinegar/both to 1 quart of fresh water. Fill your spray bottle, and mist your dog, being careful not to get it in their eyes, nose, or ears-aka avoid spraying near the face. To get up around the neck and behind the ears/their chin area, dampen a soft cloth with the mixture and wipe it on. Spray your pets bedding and around it with this mixture lightly as well.

    flea spray

    5. Flea (be-gone) bag

    This little sachet contains things that smell pleasant to us, but that drive pests away from your pet.

    You will need…

    -Two 6 inch squares of breathable fabric (such as muslin)
    -a rough handful of cedar chips
    -1-2 teaspoons of dried lavender buds
    -the peel of 1 lemon

    Directions

    Follow the instructions on how to make a sachet here if you need more detail. Cut 2 6 inch squares of fabric and place them together inside out. Sew all but 1 side and turn inside out. Fill with a rough handful of fragrant cedar chips, 1-2 teaspoons of lavender, and 1 lemon peel. Leave enough room at the top so you can tie it off with a ribbon or sew it shut (tying allows you to reuse it when the contents lose their potency.) Place under your pets bed/bedding or near it to ward off fleas. Change the mixture every month or so.

    flea bag

    6. Flea bath- wash your pup with this weekly to deter fleas.

    You will need…

    -A half a cup of freshly squeezed lemon juice*
    -1 ½ – 2 cups of fresh water
    -1/4 –1/2 cup of mild pet-friendly soap or shampoo

    Directions

    Stir together a half a cup of lemon juice, 1 ½ cups of water, and ¼ cup of mild pet-friendly shampoo or soap. Bottle and label and bathe weekly to keep fleas away.

    *amounts will vary depending on the size of your dog. As a general rule of thumb, use 2 parts water to every ½ cup of soap and lemon juice.

     

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    New Research on Spaying and Neutering

    Posted by: Kathy  /  Category: How to care for your Shih-Tzu puppy

     

    New Research on Spaying and Neutering

    Thursday, 25 April 2013 09:32 by Dr. Jane

     

    dog
     

    This month, I’d like to share with you a study on spay and neuter procedures that’s making big waves in veterinary circles. It really has surprised many people. However, before I launch into the review, I want to caution you that sometimes studies can be misleading, so let’s take the following with a grain of salt before we overhaul the way we think about the importance of alteration surgeries.

    This new study was published by researchers at the University of California – Davis. It indicates that neutering may adversely impact the risk of some dogs for developing certain cancers and joint problems. This study runs counter to prevailing sentiments, so it’s worth a review of where we stand now.

    In the U.S., pet parents overwhelmingly support the neutering of dogs, justified by concerns about overpopulation and minimizing the development of unwanted behaviors (such as roaming, aggression and marking). Nowadays, neutering is considered part of responsible pet care, and spay and neuter surgeries are usually done when dogs are less than one-year-old.

    But in the past 10 years, studies have indicated that neutering can have negative health effects for certain breeds (see references). Drawing on these previous studies, researchers at Davis used historical data from their veterinary hospital to examine the effects of neutering on the risks of several diseases in one breed, the Golden Retriever. The researchers involved chose to focus exclusively on Goldens due to their popularity in the U.S. and Europe, as well as their predisposition to certain genetic issues. The study focused on joint disorders and cancers because neutering removes sex organs (testes or ovaries), which interrupts the production of certain hormones that play important roles in key body processes (such as the closure of bone growth plate).

    The study showed that in Golden Retrievers, the rates of hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament tear (knee injury), lymphosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma and mast cell tumors were higher in both males and females that were neutered compared to intact (non-neutered) retrievers. Specifically, early neutering was associated with an increase in the occurrence of hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament tears and lymphosarcoma in males, and cranial cruciate ligament tears in females. In fact, there was a doubling of the incidence of hip dysplasia among early-neutered males.

    Another interesting finding was that late neutering (after the first heat cycle) in females was associated with a higher incidence of mast cell tumors and hemangiosarcomas, with no apparent explanation. In contrast to the rather strong evidence for neutering males and/or females as a risk factor for certain cancers and joint disorders, evidence for neutering as protection against a dog acquiring one or more cancers is weak. The most frequently mentioned is mammary cancer, however, a recent systematic review of published work on neutering and mammary tumors found the evidence that neutering reduces the risk of mammary neoplasia to be weak, at best (Beauvais W, Cardwell JM, Brodbelt DC, 2012).

    Even given the results of this new study, the relationship between neutering and disease-risk remains a very complex issue. For example, the increased incidence of joint disease seen in early neutered dogs is likely a combination of the effect on the growth plates and the increase in weight on the joints that is commonly seen in neutered dogs, and may even be affected by genetic factors yet to be determined. Obviously, more research is needed in this arena.

    This research is notable for a couple of reasons. In Goldens, it suggests that the neutering of males well post-puberty could possibly help to avoid the problems of increased rates of hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament tears and lymphosarcoma. For females, the issue is more convoluted and more studies are needed, because early neutering seems to increase the incidence rate of cranial cruciate ligament tears and late neutering may be tied to higher rates of certain cancers. For pet parents of pure-bred Goldens, the bottom line is that it is extremely important to gather all information before deciding if and when to neuter. As with all medical decisions, please review the options available to your companion animal with your veterinarian before deciding on a course of action.

    It is important to note that the results of this study are breed-specific to Golden Retrievers and cannot be extrapolated to other breeds, or dogs generally. This study may or may not be the tip of an iceberg, as a full understanding of the disease conditions affected by neutering across all breeds would require many more breed-specific studies, and these may not bear any meaningful fruit. Needless to say, veterinarians will be following new research closely.

    Pet parents wanting to learn more about this provocative study can read it at the link below (first listing under ‘References’).

    Just to be absolutely clear, I am still very much committed to neutering pets at a young age (although perhaps not the very young) due to the systemic problem of overpopulation and the horrible consequences of doing nothing at all to turn the tide.

    Thank you for all you do to make the world a better place for companion animals.

    Dr Jane Bicks  Dr. Jane Bicks

    References

    Torres de la Riva G, Hart BL, Farver TB, Oberbauer AM, Messam LL, Willits N, Hart LA. Neutering dogs: effects on joint disorders and cancers in golden retrievers. PLoS One. 2013;8(2):e55937. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0055937. Epub 2013 Feb 13. http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0055937

    Ru G, Terracini B, Glickman LT (1998) Host related risk factors for canine osteosarcoma. Vet J 156: 31–39. doi: 10.1016/S1090-0233(98)80059-2.
    Cooley DM, Beranek BC, Schlittler DL, Glickman MW, Glickman LT, et al. (2002) Endogenous gonadal hormone exposure and bone sarcoma risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prevent 11: 1434–1440.

    Ware WA, Hopper DL (1999) Cardiac tumors in dogs: 1982–1995. J Vet Intern Med 13: 95–103. doi: 10.1892/0891-6640(1999)013<0095:CTID>2.3.CO;2
    Prymak C, McKee LJ, Goldschmidt MH, Glickman LT (1988) Epidemiologic, clinical, pathologic, and prognostic characteristics of splenic hemangiosarcoma and splenic hematoma in dogs: 217 cases (1985). J Am Vet Med Assoc 193: 706–712.

    Teske E, Naan EC, van Dijk E, Van Garderen E, Schalken JA (2002) Canine prostate carcinoma: epidemiological evidence of an increased risk in castrated dogs. Mol Cell Endocrinol 197: 251–255. doi: 10.1016/S0303-7207(02)00261-7

    Villamil JA, Henry CJ, Hahn AW, Bryan JN, Tyler JW, et al. (2009) Hormonal and sex impact on the epidemiology of canine lymphoma. J Cancer Epidemiol 2009: 1–7 doi:10.1155/2009/591753.

    Root Kustritz MV (2007) Determining the optimal age for gonadectomy of dogs and cats. J Am Vet Med Assoc 231: 1665–1675. doi: 10.2460/javma.231.11.1665.

    Beauvais W, Cardwell JM, Brodbelt DC (2012) The effect of neutering on the risk of mammary tumours in dogs – a systematic review. J Small Anim Pract 53: 314–322. doi: 10.1111/j.1748-5827.2011.01220.x.

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    Shih Tzu Puppies

    Posted by: Kathy  /  Category: How to care for your Shih-Tzu puppy

    3 Adorable Shih Tzu Puppies

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